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The US Has Added Three Times More Foreign-Born Workers Than Native-Born Since December 2007

If you thought the headline jobs print was bad, wait till you see this.

While we will show the quality of the jobs shortly (you guessed it: waiters and bartenders jumped, manufacturing workers tumbled), with the presidential elections, in which immigration has become the key topic coming up, a far more relevant issue is the spread between "native-born" workers (as defined by the BLS), and "foreign-born." Expect the September data to provide much fodder for the upcoming republican and democratic debates.

But before we show what happened, here is a quick glance at the breakdown between full and part-time jobs in September. According to the BLS, 53,000 part-time jobs were added in September. The offset: a drop of 185,000 full-time jobs. Welcome, once again, to the part-time recovery we first profiled in December 2010.

 

With that out of the way, here is the punchline (which is likely related). While we "know" that a paltry 142K jobs were added according to the Establishment survey, a far more disturbing trend emerges when observing the Household survey, which conveniently breakdown down the number of "native-born" and "foreign-born" workers. In September, the latter rose by 14,000 to 24,928.

That was the good news. The bad news: native-born workers saw their ranks tumble by 262,000!

 

More disturbing, as the following chart shows, after briefly topping their December 2007 level, native-born jobs (blue line below) are now in danger of once again going back into the red. In the meantime, foreign-born workers are steadily increasing (and helping populate all those "part-time" jobs)

 

Finally, this is what the native-vs-foreign born discrepancy looks like since December 2007: in the past 8 years, there has been 300% more foreign-born workers added than native-born.

Prepare to hear much more about this statistics in the coming GOP presidential debates.

Source: Native-Born and Foreign-Born